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News and Events > Events > Online Working Memory Week 2015 (Nov 9-13)

Online Working Memory Week 2015 (Nov 9-13)

Thanks to everyone who joined us for Online Working Memory Week 2015 - the slides/recordings will be added to our recordings page| when they are available.

  

Online Working Memory Week 2015 Schedule

 

  Mon 9th
Session 1

Tue 10th Session 1|

Wed 11th Session 1| Thurs 12th Session 1| Fri 13th
Session 1
Time   12midday-1pm 10am-11am 9.30-10.30am  
Title   Update Cogmed research and Claims & Evidence Working memory impairments: Causes and responses to training across specific learning difficulties Brain stimulation does not enhance working memory training   
Presenter(s)   Dr Stina Soderqvist Erica Bottacin Elizabeth Byrne  
Registration          
           
  Mon 9th
Session 2
|
Tue 10th Session 2|  Wed 11th Session 2| Thur 12th Session 2| Fri 13th Session 2  |
Time 2pm-3pm 2pm-3pm 2.30pm-3.30pm 12midday-3.30pm 2pm-3pm
Title  Fragile X syndrome and working memory, what do we know? New Measures and Better Outcomes Exploiting touch screen computers to promote communication, social interaction and leisure
activities with people living with dementia.

Cogmed Online Training 

Working memory deficits and compensatory mechanisms in ageing and Mild Cognitive Impairment: Does adaptive training work?
Presenter(s) Dr Sonya Campbell Benjamin Zachs Dr Sarah K Smith Dr Darren Dunning Dr Roy Kessels
Registration          
           
  Mon 9th
Session 3
|
Tue 10th Session 3| Wed 11th Session 3| Thurs 12th Session 3 Fri 13th Session 3
Time 3pm-4pm 4pm-5pm 4pm-5pm    
Title Using Cogmed as an independent practitioner in the UK Working Memory Development Across the Preschool Period: A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study Working Memory: Past, Present and Future    
Presenter(s) Joanne Thornton Susan Pearlman Professor Alan Baddeley    
Register          
           
  Mon 9th Session 4 Tue 10th Session 4 Wed 11th Session 4| Thurs 12th Session 4 Fri 13th Session 4
Time     6pm-7pm    
Title     Cogmed working memory training as part of the curriculum - evidence of long term benefits in reading and maths    
Presenter(s)     Dr Sissela Nutley    
Register          

 

 

 

Monday 9th November

  

Dr Sonya CampbellDate / Time: Monday, November 9, 2pm-3pm (Session 2)

Presenter(s): Dr Sonya Campbell|

Title: Fragile X syndrome and working memory, what do we know?

Thanks to everyone who attended - the recording and slides| are now available on our recordings page 

Synopsis: An introduction to the work being carried out by Dr Sonya Campbell regarding Fragile X syndrome and it's links to working memory at The Patrick Wild Centre in Edinburgh. 

About The Patrick Wild Centre:

The mission of the Centre is to understand the neurological basis of, and to test new therapies for, autism, Fragile X Syndrome and intellectual disabilities by fostering collaborations between world-class basic science and clinical research at The University of Edinburgh. 

The goals of the Centre are: 

  • To identify the genes and protein pathways that cause these disorders. 
  • To understand the alterations in brain cells that prevent their effective communication in people with these conditions. 
  • To develop and test therapeutic strategies for these disorders. 
  • To engage the people affected by these conditions as well as their families and those who support them to better understand their difficulties.

 

 

Date / Time: Monday, November 9, 3pm-4pm (Session 3)

Presenter(s): Joanne Thornton|

Title: Using Cogmed as an independent practitioner in the UK

Thanks to everyone who attended - the recording and slides| are now available on our recordings page   

Synopsis: Joanne Thornton is a Special Educational Needs coordinator and has over twenty years’ experience as a primary school teacher. She is a dyslexia and literacy specialist and has been using Cogmed independently for three years. Having coached children and adults through the Cogmed working memory program, Joanne has seen consistent and measurable improvement in working memory with her clients. 

In this talk Joanne will discuss key features of Cogmed from an independent coach’s perspective, including: 

  • Best practice: How to get the most out of training.
  • Supporting parents/caregivers
  • Finding clients.
  • Case studies based on real life cases.
  • Hints and tips for the Cogmed coach.

 

 

Tuesday 10th November

Stina SoderqvistDate / Time: Tuesday 10th November, 12midday-1pm (Session 1)

Presenter(s): Dr Stina Soderqvist|

Title: Update Cogmed research and Claims & Evidence

Thanks to everyone who attended - the recording and slides| are now available on our recordings page 

Abstract: Cogmed Working Memory Training (CWMT) was initially founded based on results from scientific research. The scientific foundation has since continued to be crucial for how the programme is developed and for the claims Cogmed make regarding its efficacy. In this presentation I will introduce the methodology behind this work, especially discussing methodological considerations to take into account when interpreting research using Cogmed, and describing the criteria Cogmed uses when forming or revising a claim of its efficacy. I will also give a brief summary of the body of research literature to date which underlies the claims that Cogmed currently makes. Finally I will discuss strengths and weaknesses in the current cognitive training research literature and identify aspects that should be taken into consideration in future research. 

 

 

Date / Time: Tuesday 10th November, 2pm-3pm (Session 2)

Presenter(s): Benjamin Zachs|, Cogmed Product Manager

Title: New Measures and Better Outcomes

Thanks to everyone who attended - the recording and slides| are now available on our recordings page    

Abstract: In this presentation Benjamin Zachs will present the new "Trends" feature in Cogmed which measures a trainee or a group of trainees compliance, validity, and motivation. 

See how this new feature works and how it has affected large group trainings.

 

 

Susan PearlmanDate / Time: Tuesday 10th November, 4pm-5pm (Session 3)

Presenter(s): Susan Pearlman

Title: Working Memory Development Across the Preschool Period: A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

Thanks to everyone who attended - the recording and slides| are now available on our recordings page    

Synopsis:My talk will focus on a study in which we used functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to quantify the development of working memory in the lateral prefrontal cortex in preschool children (ages 3-7). I will also present a follow-up to this study in which neural mechanisms for working memory correlated with irritability in preschool children. This research is aimed at investigating the cognition-emotion interaction in children at-risk for psychopathology.

 

 

Wednesday 11th November

Date / Time: Wednesday 11th November, 10am-11am (Session 1)

Presenter(s): Erica Bottacin|

Title: Working memory impairments: Causes and responses to training across specific learning difficulties.

Thanks to everyone who attended - the recording and slides| will be added to our recordings page when they are available.     

Abstract: Specific impairments in visuo-spatial aspects of working memory are associated with mathematical difficulties that occur in the absence of poor reading skills (Scuzs, Devine, Soltesz, Nobes & Gabriel, 2013).

In contrast, both verbal and visuo-spatial working memory impairments are reported in children with specific reading difficulties (Wang & Gathercole, 2013). The extent to which these different profiles of working memory deficits represent fundamental difficulties in learning disorders is not well understood. Working memory relies on adequate sensory inputs and is part of a broad network of higher-order cognitive control functions, including inhibition and selective attention. Difficulties in any of these interfacing systems will impact on working memory performance. The aims of this study were i) to identify the potential source of working memory problems in children with mathematical difficulties and children with comorbid reading and maths problems, and ii) to investigate whether different profiles of working memory impairment impact on responsiveness to working memory training. Implications for the diagnosis and remediation of learning difficulties associated with working memory problems are discussed.

 

 

Dr Sarah K SmithDate / Time:  Wednesday 11th November, 2.30pm-3.30pm (Session 2)

Presenter(s):  Dr Sarah K Smith|

Title: Exploiting touch screen tech to promote communication, social interaction & leisure activities with people living with dementia.

Thanks to everyone who attended - the recording and slides| will be added to our recordings page when they are available.      

Abstract: It has been widely theorised that working memory overlaps significantly with that of short-term memory and some argue that they are both describing the same system. The concept of working memory was developed by Baddeley and Hitch (1974) in order to understand the increasingly complex findings from studies involving short-term memory. It was proposed that the concept of short-term memory be replaced by that of a working memory system comprising a number of sub-components. 

One of the first social casualties of dementia can be the disruption of verbal communication and social interaction triggered by short-term or working memory impairment. We need an intact short term memory in order to participate equally in conversations and interactions with others. As a small team of Psychologists at the University of Sheffield, we are focusing on the possibly ways that contemporary ICT’s, specifically touch-screen computers, may contribute towards and support communication with people living with dementia, their caregivers and relatives.

This talk will describe evidence from innovative interventions which demonstrate that people with dementia can enjoy interacting with contemporary ICT’s for social and leisure purposes, irrespective of their level of impairment. Such technologies are an effective tool and valuable in facilitating communication, allowing the acquisition of new knowledge or generally promoting enjoyable activities to participate with. These findings suggest that people living with dementia have the same or even greater potential to benefit from technology as the rest of the population thus dispelling existing stereotypes and negative expectations. 

 

 

Professor Alan BaddeleyDate / Time: Wednesday 11th November, 4pm-5pm (Session 3)

Presenter: Professor Alan Baddeley

Title: Working Memory; Past, Present and Future

Thanks to everyone who attended - the recording and slides| are now available on our recordings page    

Synopsis: An account will be given of the development of the multicomponent of working memory, describing the development of its verbal, visuo-spatial and attentional subsystems, and how this has benefitted from attempts to address clinical and educational issues. This will be followed by a brief account of the need for a fourth component, the episodic buffer that binds information from a range of sources and makes the resulting content accessible to conscious awareness. I will conclude with a consideration of other approaches to working memory and speculate on possible future developments.

 

 

Date / Time: Wednesday 11th November, 6pm-7pm (Session 4)

Presenter: Dr Sissela Nutley|

Title: Cogmed working memory training as part of the curriculum - evidence of long term benefits in reading and maths

Thanks to everyone who attended - the recording and slides| will be added to our recordings page when they are available.     

Synopsis: In this talk I will focus on the research base of working memory training and improvements in academic performance.

It is well established that working memory is associated with attention and scholastic achievement and there is overwhelming evidence that working memory can be trained, however transfer from working memory training to scholastic achievement is not always demonstrated. This issue is discussed with regards to previous studies on Cogmed working memory training and a new study with typically developing Swedish school children is presented.

The results from this study demonstrate a steeper development in reading and maths as measured with standard academic tests two years following training, compared to a control group. Possible routes that may explain how an increased working memory could impact academic achievement are discussed.

  

 

Thursday 12th November

Date / Time: Thursday 12th November, 9.30am-10.30am (Session 1)

Presenter(s): Elizabeth Byrne

Title: Brain stimulation does not enhance working memory training

Thanks to everyone who attended - the recording and slides| will be added to our recordings page when they are available.   

Abstract:  Accumulating evidence suggests that working memory (WM) training enhances performance on untrained memory tasks that are highly similar to the training activities, but there is little evidence that these gains generalise to distinct memory tasks or to benefits in everyday functions that rely on WM.

Non-invasive brain stimulation is increasingly viewed as a promising way to facilitate learning. In this experiment we investigated whether stimulation could enhance the rate and magnitude of training gains already established and whether it could extend training benefits beyond highly similar untrained tasks.

In a double-blind randomised controlled study, 30 healthy young adult participants received either active or sham stimulation over bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex while completing 10 sessions of adaptive WM training. Both groups showed significant gains on trained activities and on tests of memory that shared overlapping component processes with the trained tasks. There was no evidence that stimulation enhanced these gains, or that it modulated transfer to memory tasks involving different processes to the training tasks. These data challenge the idea that brain stimulation is an effective tool for facilitating learning. 

 

 

Dr Darren DunningDate / Time: Thursday 12th November, 12midday-3.30pm (Session 2)

Presenter(s): Dr Darren Dunning

Title: Cogmed Online Training

Thanks to everyone who attended - the recording and slides| are now available on our recordings page 

Synopsis: Dr Darren Dunning presents Cogmed training online. This training will include. 

  • An introduction to working memory.
  • The effects of training working memory
  • Demonstration of the training programs
  • Cogmed Training web - the coaching tool
  • Working as a coach
  • The Cogmed Coaching Method and strategies for implementing Cogmed. 

Training will last around 3 hours, with opportunities to ask questions throughout. There will be a short break halfway through and slides will be provided. 

We also ensure that you are provided with the latest research and development about working memory training and experiences from our work. Our support will help you with both technical and practical questions related to using Cogmed.

 

 

 

Friday 13th November

  

Date / Time: Friday 13th November, 2pm-3pm (Session 2)

Presenter(s): Dr Roy Kessels

Title: Working memory deficits and compensatory mechanisms in ageing and Mild Cognitive Impairment: Does adaptive training work?

Thanks to everyone who attended - the recording and slides| are now available on our recordings page   

Abstract:  Research into the cognitive profile of amnestic MCI and (early) Alzheimer’s dementia (AD) has focused on episodic memory deficits and the role of medial-temporal lobe dysfunction. Working memory has long been regarded a function that remains relatively spared in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease (including MCI) compared to normal ageing.

However, there is increasing evidence that working memory is already impaired in the MCI stage and that working memory deficits may be predictive for later conversion to dementia. Assessment of  working memory in clinical practice is, however, often limited. In this talk, I will present recent studies on the role of working memory in MCI and early AD in relation to Baddeley’s working memory model, notably the episodic buffer. Furthermore, I will focus on ageing-related compensatory mechanisms which may be potentially strengthened using adaptive working memory training. I will present our recent findings on the effects of the Cogmed adaptive working memory training in both MCI patients and healthy older adults on near- and far-transfer tasks. I will also discuss the role of working-memory related frontal-lobe changes as measured with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in these groups.

 

 

Recordings and slides from Online Working Memory Week 2014

Recordings and slides from Online Working Memory Week are available on our recordings page|.

 

 

Last updated: November 19, 2015 

 
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