Pearson Assessment - Homepage
Call us on 0845 630 88 88
Calls cost 3p per minute plus your phone company's access charge begin_of_the_skype_highlighting   0845 630 88 88  FREE    end_of_the_skype_highlighting

MIPS Revised (Millon Index of Personality Styles Revised) - Frequently Asked Questions

What is the MIPS Revised test designed to do?

In what settings is the MIPS Revised test appropriate?

How is the MIPS Revised test different from the original MIPS test?

The MIPS Revised test is comprised of contrasting bipoloar scale pairs. Does a high score on one scale necessarily mean a low score on the other scale?

Why are prevalence scores (PS) used instead of T scores?

What is the relevance of the Positive and Negative Impression scores?

Will recording the wrong gender make a difference on the profile?


What is the MIPS Revised test designed to do?

The MIPS Revised test helps address the need for a theoretically grounded instrument that may be administered by a broad range of professionals. This comprehensive test provides a greater range of information than many other assessments of normal personality, while offering the efficiency of a brief, easy-to-administer tool.

In what settings is the MIPS Revised test appropriate?

It is useful as a counselling tool in private practice and university counselling centers as well as for career guidance, employee assistance and development programs, and job applicant screening.

How is the MIPS Revised test different from the original MIPS test?

Scale names and profile display were updated to provide administrators with a better, more intuitive approach to interpreting test results.

The MIPS Revised test is comprised of contrasting bipolar scale pairs. Does a high score on one scale necessarily mean a low score on the other scale?

No. Although the bipolarities in the MIPS Revised test appear to present clear contrasts in personality styles, individuals rarely fall unequivocally at one or another extreme. In other words, each bipolar construct represents a continuum on which an individual's scores will fall somewhere on a gradient that represents the extent to which he/she exhibits the characteristic in question.

back to top

Why are prevalence scores (PS) used instead of T scores?

The prevalence score scaling procedure used for the MIPS test is preferred to T scores because prevalence scores more accurately reflect differences in the prevalence of various personality traits in the population. The use of T-score transformations would impose an arbitrary statistical rule that bears little resemblance to the reality of normal population prevalence rates and would inaccurately represent the distribution of many personality traits.

What is the relevance of the Positive and Negative Impression scores?

The MIPS Revised test contains two scales that attempt to measure the extent to which an individual's response style is characteristic of a positive-impression or negative-impression response set. The Positive Impression (PI) scale was designed to identify those individuals who tried to create an overly positive impression of themselves on the test. The Negative Impression (NI) scale, on the other hand, was designed to identify individuals whose responses tend to be associated with a generally negative self-perception.

Will recording the wrong gender make a difference on the profile?

Yes, because the MIPS Revised test has separate male and female norms.

 

back to top

 

Key Information

Description

A brief, well-rounded personality measure designed to assess normal personality styles for adults

Author(s)

Dr Theodore Millon

Publication Year

2003

Age Range

18 years and older

Administration

Individuals - 30 minutes

Qualification Code

CL2


£252.00 (Complete kit price from)
 
 
  .
Bookmark with: What are these? |
What do you think?