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News and Events > Events > Online Working Memory Week 2013 - Presentation details

Online Working Memory Week 2013 - Presentation details

Here are details of the presentations from Online Working Memory Week 2013. If you'd like to see the slides/recordings, please email marketing@pearsonclinical.co.uk and we will send you the details.

Please visit our Online Working Memory 2014 page for details about 2014's event.

Online Working Memory Week 2013 Schedule

 

Mon 18th Session 1

Tue 19th Session 1

Wed 20th Session 1 Thurs 21st Session 1 Fri 22nd Session 1
Time 2-3pm 11am-12 2-3pm 11am-12 11am-12
Title Part one: Working Memory Training: Is it strategic? Part two: Disorders of working memory: Causes and remediation Understanding the role of metacognition and working memory in maths achievement What is Cogmed? An Introduction. Cogmed: Tools to illustrate and monitor training effects Cogmed Training Web explained
Presenter(s) Dr Joni Holmes and Dr Darren Dunning Dr Emma Walker Ali Winter Shelley Hughes Ali Winter
Registration    
   
Tue 19th Session 2  Thur 21st Session 2
Time 2-3pm 2-3pm 
Title  Interindividual differences in working memory training

Do changes in attention mediate anxiety reductions in interventions aimed to improve working memory cap?

Presenters Dr Stina Soderqvist Helen J Richards, PhD
Registration  
   
Tue 19th Session 3 Wed 20th Session 2 Thurs 21st Session 3 Fri 22nd Session 2
Time 4-5pm 6-7pm 4-5pm 2-3pm
Title Cogmed: Research and Clinical Evaluation Overview Memory profiles in children with Down syndrome following Cogmed intervention - a comparison to MA equivalent TD children Neural basis of Working memory - development and relation to mathematics Stickability, Learning Journeys and Working Memory
Presenters Shelley Hughes Dr Stephanie Bennett Professor Torkel Klingberg David Crabtree
Register    

 

 

Monday 18th November

Date / Time: November 18, 2-3pm (Session 1)

Presenter(s): Dr Darren Dunning and Dr Joni Holmes

Title / Synopsis: Part one: Working Memory Training: Is it strategic? / Part two: Disorders of working memory: Causes and remediation

Register: Thanks to all who attended - Recordings/slides have been emailed to all those who registered for the webinar. If you didn't register, and would like to receive access to the Recordings/slides, please email marketing@pearsonclinical.co.uk.

Abstract: This presentation will be divided into two parts    

Part one: Working Memory Training: Is it strategic?

Adaptive computerised training has been associated with significant enhancements in working memory, but the nature of the cognitive changes that underpin these improvements are not yet fully understood.

In two studies we investigate the possibility that training stimulates the development of strategies:

In Study 1, 20 participants completed four tests of working memory before and after 10 sessions of working memory training. Open-ended interviews about strategy use were conducted after each working memory task at both pre- and post-training. Following training, there were significant improvements in all four working memory tasks, and a significant increase in the overall number of strategies participants reported using to complete these tasks. More specifically, there was a significant increase in the number of participants using chunking post-training.

In Study 2, a randomised controlled trial was conducted with 45 adults. Participants received adaptive working memory training, non-adaptive working memory training with low memory loads, or no training. Adaptive training was associated with selective improvements in multiple untrained tests of working memory, with a significant increase in the use of chunking reported for verbal and visuo-spatial short-term memory and verbal working memory tasks. These results demonstrate that training related improvements in working memory may be, in part, mediated by implicit and spontaneous changes in the use of chunking strategies. The practical implications of these findings are discussed in terms of promoting the transfer of training gains to real world activities that tax working memory.

Part two: Disorders of working memory: Causes and remediation

Working memory, the system used to maintain and process information for short periods of time, supports classroom learning. Deficits in working memory are associated with many common developmental disorders including specific language impairment, ADHD and dyslexia, and have been widely suggested to be the cause of many of the problems children with these disorders face in learning, following instructions, and maintaining attention. Poor working memory skills are similarly linked with difficulties in reading and mathematics in children who do not have diagnosed specific learning difficulties.

Despite being very common, little is known about either the causes of working memory impairments or how to treat them. Here I will discuss work that is investigating the cognitive and neural basis of disorders of working memory. This involves the development of an online diagnostic assessment, training studies with children with disorders characterised by working memory problems (e.g. children with language difficulties), and investigations into different methods of cognitive training to establish the best approach for enhancing the flexible use of working memory in everyday life.

 

 

Tuesday 19th November

Date / Time: November 19, 11am-12midday (Session 1)

Presenter(s): Dr Emma Walker

Title / Synopsis: Understanding the role of metacognition and working memory in maths achievement

Register: Thanks to all who attended - Recordings/slides have been emailed to all those who registered for the webinar. If you didn't register, and would like to receive access to the Recordings/slides, please email marketing@pearsonclinical.co.uk.

Abstract: The current study utilised a randomised control design to allocate 12-13-year-olds who were identified by their school as underachieving in maths to a working memory (WM) or a one-to-one tutoring/ metacognitive (MC) intervention group to increase maths attainment.

In addition, it considered whether these interventions would have a positive effect on adolescent reports of anxiety. Maths achievement, WM, MC and anxiety were measured at pre- and post-intervention and at follow-up (around 8 weeks after the intervention). Considering change at the level of the group mean, significant improvements in maths achievement and WM were found for both intervention groups post-intervention and follow-up, compared with baseline scores. 

In addition, a significant reduction in anxiety was also found over time for both groups. Individual change was more mixed, with around 10% to 38% of adolescents across the two interventions showing statistically significant change. There was no evident change in self-report MC following either intervention. Further analysis highlighted that maths attainment at follow-up was most clearly predicted by pre-intervention maths scores and adolescent reports of anxiety reduction from pre-intervention to follow-up. The results are discussed in relation to the implications for educational interventions.

 

Date / Time: November 19, 2-3pm (Session 2)

Presenter(s): Dr Stina Soderqvist

Title / Synopsis: Interindividual differences in working memory training

Register: Thanks to all who attended - Recordings/slides have been emailed to all those who registered for the webinar. If you didn't register, and would like to receive access to the Recordings/slides, please email marketing@pearsonclinical.co.uk.

Abstract: My presentation will focus on how different individuals differ in their response to working memory training. 

This will be highlighted as an important factor for understanding practical outcomes of training as well as informing us of its underlying biological mechanisms. I will present two different types of studies that have focused on this.

First, a study involving training of working memory and non-verbal reasoning in children with intellectual disability will be presented. Results from this study show that amount of progress during training predicted the amount of transfer that was later observed on working memory tasks. Furthermore, we found that baseline cognitive capacity and clinical diagnoses significantly influenced training progress.

Second, I will present a couple of studies focusing on genetic influence on training improvements. By investigating the role of common genetic variants important for the brain’s dopaminergic functions, we have identified variants in two different genes that significantly influence improvements during training (the dopamine transporter and dopamine receptor D2 genes).

In addition variants in the dopamine D2 receptor gene were found to interact with ratings of perceived competence in predicating training performance. This suggests that these variants are not only important for actual training improvements but also for how children perceive their own performance. Taken together, these studies highlight factors that influence an individual’s ability to improve during training. Further knowledge in this field could lead to a better ability in the future to develop more individually adapted training paradigms, maximizing the training benefits for each individual. 

 

Date / Time: November 19, 4-5pm (Session 3)

Presenter(s): Shelley Hughes (Cogmed Product Manager UK)

Title / Synopsis: Cogmed: Research and Clinical Evaluation Overview

Register: Thanks to all who attended - Recordings/slides have been emailed to all those who registered for the webinar. If you didn't register, and would like to receive access to the Recordings/slides, please email marketing@pearsonclinical.co.uk.

Abstract: Computer based working memory training is a relatively new phenomena for educators and clinicians. With this comes a continuous flow of new evidence and research which can be time consuming to gather and review. This session will provide an overview of the latest research developments for Cogmed Working Memory Training from numerous sources and levels of rigor, namely: 

  • Independent Academic Research
  • Internal Pearson Projects [Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs)]
  • School Research Partners Program - planned in conjunction with Cogmed to do RCTs in school supported solely by school staff
  • Clinical Evaluations - clinicians providing Cogmed with data to analyse and report. 

 

Wednesday 20th November

Date / Time: November 20, 2-3pm (Session 1)

Presenter(s): Ali Winter (Sales Consultant and Cogmed Trainer)

Title / Synopsis: What is Cogmed? An Introduction

Register: Thanks to all who attended - Recordings/slides have been emailed to all those who registered for the webinar. If you didn't register, and would like to receive access to the Recordings/slides, please email marketing@pearsonclinical.co.uk.

Abstract: An introduction to Cogmed delivered by Alison Winter, Sales Consultant and Cogmed trainer. This presentation will cover the basics of working memory and what it means to learning, a brief introduction to the programs and explanation of the Cogmed model for UK based customers.

The presentation should last around 45 minutes with an open forum for Q&As at the end.

 

Date / Time: November 20, 6-7pm (Session 2)

Presenter(s): Dr Stephanie Bennett

Title / Synopsis: Memory profiles in children with Down syndrome following Cogmed intervention - a comparison to MA equivalent TD children

Register: Thanks to all who attended - Recordings/slides have been emailed to all those who registered for the webinar. If you didn't register, and would like to receive access to the Recordings/slides, please email marketing@pearsonclinical.co.uk.

Abstract: The work presented reports in further detail memory outcomes for children with Down syndrome (DS) following intervention with Cogmed JM. In addition, a group of Mental Age (MA) matched Typically Developing (TD) children have been assessed using the Automated Working Memory Assessment (AWMA). Comparisons have been made between memory profiles for the two groups of children, and the impact of intervention for the DS group evaluated. Initial findings suggest that the Cogmed JM intervention boosted visual short term memory scores for children with DS to be equivalent to TD children's visual memory scores (of the same MA). Further work is needed to explore this finding due to the small sample sizes (total N = 38). 

 

Thursday 21st November

Date / Time: November 21, 11am-12 midday (Session 1)

Presenter(s): Shelley Hughes (Cogmed Product Manager UK)

Title / Synopsis: Cogmed: Tools to illustrate and monitor training effects

Register: Thanks to all who attended - Recordings/slides have been emailed to all those who registered for the webinar. If you didn't register, and would like to receive access to the Recordings/slides, please email marketing@pearsonclinical.co.uk.

Abstract: As the evidence base for Cogmed Working Memory Training evolves we are continuously reviewing the program and making improvements to benefit the end user and coach. This session will provide an overview of the latest innovations from the Cogmed team, covering: 

  • Cogmed Performance Indicator (CPI): how to use this tool, development of the CPI, and preliminary data based on UK and US trainings.
  • The Cogmed Questionnaire: Integrated self-rating questionnaires to assist coaches in assessing the improvements in attention and behaviour that occur through training, as well as trainee motivation

 

Date / Time: November 21, 2-3pm (Session 2)

Presenter(s): Helen J Richards, PhD

Title / Synopsis: Do changes in attention mediate anxiety reductions in interventions aimed to improve working memory cap?

Register: Thanks to all who attended - Recordings/slides have been emailed to all those who registered for the webinar. If you didn't register, and would like to receive access to the Recordings/slides, please email marketing@pearsonclinical.co.uk

Abstract: Conceptual frameworks suggest that working memory capacity is lowered in individuals with elevated anxiety due to interference from worry-related thoughts and impairments in attentional control. 

In young people, there is evidence to suggest that poor working memory is a mechanism that underlies the relationship between elevated anxiety and lowered academic achievement. The current paper presents findings from a randomised controlled trial in which young people reporting elevated anxiety and lowered attentional control were allocated to a computerised working memory training program or a group-based CBT program.

We assessed whether the working memory and CBT interventions were effective in improving working memory and reducing anxiety. We also considered the possibility that the interventions would have broader positive effects on attentional control (as indexed by cognitive tasks related to inhibitory control and attention to threat) and academic achievement (spelling and maths).

We consider two hypotheses: 1) Reduced anxiety leads to improvements in attentional control and reductions in attention to threat; 2) Improvements in attentional control and reductions in attention to threat mediate changes in anxiety. Therefore, the results have implications for understanding the pathways to elevated anxiety and underachievement in school via poor attentional control and increased attention to threat. The findings also have implications for developing a viable intervention protocol that could be used within the school environment to ensure that young people with elevated anxiety can achieve a positive learning outcome and experience reduced anxiety. 

 

Date / Time: November 21, 4-5pm (Session 3)

Presenter(s): Professor Torkel Klingberg

Title / Synopsis: Neural basis of Working memory - development and relation to mathematics

Register: Thanks to all who attended - Recordings/slides have been emailed to all those who registered for the webinar. If you didn't register, and would like to receive access to the Recordings/slides, please email marketing@pearsonclinical.co.uk.

Abstract: Working memory develops throughout childhood and adolescence. This process is important for attentive behavior in everyday life and for academic performance. Neurobiologically this development is associated to changes in cortical thickness and brain activity in fronto-parietal networks of the brain and the white matter tracts connecting these regions. More recent studies has also shown that common variations in several genes relates to this development. The neural changes in parietal cortex seems especially important for the relationship between working memory and mathematics. 

 

Friday 22nd November

Date / Time: November 22, 11am-12 midday (Session 1)

Presenter(s): Ali Winter

Title / Synopsis: Cogmed Training Web explained

Register: Thanks to all who attended - Recordings/slides have been emailed to all those who registered for the webinar. If you didn't register, and would like to receive access to the Recordings/slides, please email marketing@pearsonclinical.co.uk.

Abstract: This presentation will aid a Cogmed coach in the interpretation of data from the Cogmed training web. From analysing the data from graphs, training index and CPI to general functionality.

The presentation should last around 45 minutes with an open forum for Q&As at the end.

 

Date / Time: November 22, 2-3pm (Session 2)

Presenter(s): David Crabtree

Title / Synopsis: Stickability, Learning Journeys and Working Memory

Register: Thanks to all who attended - Recordings/slides have been emailed to all those who registered for the webinar. If you didn't register, and would like to receive access to the Recordings/slides, please email marketing@pearsonclinical.co.uk.

Abstract: I have been working with the Harris Federation developing a training programme for classroom teachers and support staff that responds to the new Teachers Standards giving teachers knowledge and understanding of how pupils learn and how pupils with Specific Learning Difficulties learn differently. It aims to equip teachers and support staff with a range of practical strategies to enable them to plan effectively together to enable all pupils, and in particular those with Spld, to make expected progress.  We move from the more generic - integrated multisensory techniques to get information into short-term memory and then how to make learning 'stick' in the long-term memory. We have created Learning Journeys and have developed training for in-class interventions to improve learning opportunities for students with working memory and processing speed difficulties.

 

Last updated: May 9, 2014

 
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