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Key information

A resource to support parents, teachers, preschool and child-care staff and health professionals working with children who are fidgety, easily distracted, messy, clumsy and disruptive to others.

Author(s):

Kate Pascale

Publication Year:

2010

Age Range:

Child

Qualification Code:

UNAS

Read the full product description

Parents, teachers, preschool and child-care staff and health professionals each bring a unique and valuable set of skills to a child and his or her family.

At times it can be frustrating and tiring to work with children who are fidgety, easily distracted, messy, clumsy and disruptive to others.

It can also be difficult to support these children and their families to manage their challenging behaviours at home and in the community. Understanding where to go, who to ask and how to access further advice or support is often complex for professionals and families alike.

This resource has been developed to support you in your role, encourage you to think differently about children’s behaviour, and to give you another set of tools for your professional toolbox.

Rely on this resource to help you to: 

  • understand sensory processing
  • recognise Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD)
  • understand how SPD may interfere with a child's physical, social and emotional development
  • look at children's behaviours in a new way and understand why each child behaves and learns differently
  • structure a calm and organized environment
  • develop strategies to help manage challenging behaviours
  • collaborate with parents, occupational therapists and other professionals about children's sensory development

 

 

Price list

Can't You See I'm Sensational?
ISBN: 9780749160371
£79.00
£79.00 inc VAT
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